User data migration with USMT – where what how

I don’t like long explanations, directory locations or long talks on the phone. I enjoy long walks in the forest or long concerts.
So if you want to use USMT version (while I am writing this) it’s version 6.2.9200.16384 *version 5.0) there is a pretty Technet blog post that explain more about USMT 5.0 vs 4.0 etc… but wait, it says USMT 5.0 in the blog post title, but the post refers to USMT 4.0
Then there’s always the User State Migration Tool (USMT) Technical Reference or 113000 hits on google containing the words USMT and Video.

So you don’t really need this just-another-blog-post do you 🙂
I just want to tell you TWO THINGS about USMT that I wanted to know:
1. Where the hell is the commandline USMT located
2. How do I extract a .mig file (usmt.mig)

Well, the command line version of USMT is installed in the following folder when you download and install Microsoft ADK

USMT location after installing ADK (Assessment and Deployment Kit)

…and I don’t won’t to call usmtutils.exe from
C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\8.0\Assessment and deployment kit\User State Migration Tool\amd64… *phew* every time SO I copied the necessary files from C:\Program Files\Bla\Bla\Bla\User State Bla\amd64 to C:\USMT instead.
After doing that there will be a usmtutils.log file in C:\USMT when you run the command usmtutils.exe /? and a short explanation is displayed in the command prompt.

Needed dlls when copying usmtutils.exe to other locations

So now I can extract an usmt.mig file with usmtutils.exe by executing the following

msutils.exe /extract c:\usmt\mig\USMT.MIG C:\usmt\extract

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How to make users ask for permission to access folders the Windows 8/Server 2012 way

-“I can’t access this folder”
-“What’s the name of the folder you are trying to access”?
-“I don’t know… G something”
-“…Ok… can you tell me the name of  a colleague who’s got access to the folder”?
-“Yes! There’s Peter, but I don’t know his last name”
And thus the interrogation continues…

But wait! With Windows 8 and Server 2012 we configure Access Denied Assistance Message and let the user click a button to provide us with the information we need when managing access to folders.
How neat isn’t this:

The configured message on the Windows 8 Client
What the mail function looks like on the client

 So basically, the user can request permission, you have configured a folder owner e-mail adress, what information the mail will contain (such as folder path etc) for a shared folder, and voila, no communication needed from either side 🙂

Where to configure Request Assistance message for a share

The customized message specified for a share

And of course you can configure this with Group Policy to apply if for all files and folders.
Computer configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\System\Access-Denied Assistance 


Anyway, there are a LOT of more (and I dare say it) awesome features that makes it easier for both the user and the administrator when it comes to file and resource management, but that’s another day and another blog post. 🙂